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Which should I use? nexus-plugin-prisma vs nexus-prisma vs Vanilla Nexus

Vanilla Nexus

npm | github

If stability is the most important thing for you then Prisma+Nexus vanilla is probably good for you.

  • pro: flexible
  • pro: stable
  • con: If you have a lot of boilerplate CRUD then might feel painful

nexus-plugin-prisma

npm | github

If automatic CRUD is the most important thing for you then maybe stick with the old nexus-prisma.

  • pro: rich automated CRUD featureset
  • con: not flexible
  • con: not being actively maintained
  • con: not kept up to date with Prisma
  • con: buggy

nexus-prisma

npm | github

If you would benefit from model projection features and are ok with using early access software then consider nexus-prisma.

  • pro: flexible
  • pro: maintained
  • con: early access, things may change, bugs may be present, features may be incomplete.

Working with Bundlers

Disable Peer Dependency Check

When working with bundlers, it probably makes sense to disable the runtime peer dependency check system since the bundle step is merging the dependency tree into a single file and may be moved to run standalone away from the original project manifest (e.g. in a docker container).

Instructions to do this can be found here.

General Support

nexus-prisma has tests showing that it supports ncc. Other bundlers are not tested and may or may not work. It is our goal however that nexus-prisma not be the reason for any popular bundler to not work on your project. So if you encounter a problem with one (e.g. parcel), open an issue here and we'll fix the issue including an addition to our test suite.

For users of nexus-prisma@=<0.20

Versions of nexus-prisma package prior to 0.20 were a completely different version of the API, and had also become deprecated at one point to migrate to nexus-plugin-prisma when Nexus Framework was being worked on. All of that is history.

For users of nexus@=<1.0

The release of Nexus 1.1 introduced an overload to t.field allowing improved usage of Nexus Prisma. The difference is as follows. Note if you prefer the older way that is and always will be supported too.

import { User } from 'nexus-prisma'
import { makeSchema, objectType } from 'nexus'
 
export const schema = makeSchema({
  types: [
    objectType({
      name: User.$name
      description: User.$description
      definition(t) {
+        t.field(User.id) //                 <-- for nexus@>=1.1 users
-        t.field(User.id.name, User.id) //   <-- For nexus@=<1.0 users
      }
    })
  ]
})

Supported Versions Of Node

We only officially support what we test.

We test Node versions that are Active LTS and Current. For which versions of Node that equals you can refer to our tests or look here: https://nodejs.org/en/about/releases.

Supported Versions Of @prisma/client

We only officially support what we test.

We test Prisma Client versions 2.30.x, 2.29.x.

Supported Versions Of ts-node

We only officially support what we test.

We test ts-node versions 10.x.

Reminder: ts-node is an optional peer dep required when you are working with the gentime settings.

Matrix Testing Policy

We test the latest versions of @prisma/client against Node 16 and 14 on Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows while past versions of @prisma/client are tested only against Node 16 on Ubuntu. We do this to keep the CI test matris reasonable as the number of past @prisma/client versions supported could grow long.

Patch Version Support Policy

We only support the latest patch version of a minor series. For example imagine that there was a bug when nexus-prisma was integrated with @prisma/client@2.30.1 but not when integrated with @prisma/client@2.30.2. Our policy would be that users should upgrade to the latest 2.30.x version, and that we would not release any no code changes of nexus-prisma.